1 / 12       Le Kremlin à Moscou, (1889-1911).

2 / 12       Le Bateau de Marbre au Palais d’Été à Pékin, (1889-1911).

3 / 12       Cuisine de rue à Naples, (1889-1911).

4 / 12       Le phare Eddystone à Plymouth, (1889- 1911).

5 / 12       Débarquement d’un bateau à vapeur à Alger, (1896).

6 / 12       Lucerne et le Pilate, (1889-1902).

7 / 12       Le Cervin et l’Hôtel Riffelhaus à Riffelberg, (1893).

8 / 12       La vieille ville de Biskra, (1889-1911).

9 / 12       La sortie du tunnel du Gotthard à Göschenen, (mars 1901).

10 / 12       Groupe de bédouins dans le désert d’Israël, (1895) par Félix Bonfils.

11 / 12       Le château de Chillon au bord du Lac Léman et les Dents-du-Midi, (1889-1911).

12 / 12       Le Vieux-Port de Marseille, (1889-1911).

The world in Photochromes

It all began in the 1880s when Hans Jakob Schmid (1856-1924), a lithographer from Zurich, perfected a magnificent photographic colour printing process, called Photochrom, starting from a black and white negative and transferring onto as many lithographic stones as the number of colours wanted in the final picture. This produced a finely nuanced rendering at a time when colour photography was still in its earliest infancy. The Zurich Printing Company, Orell Füssli, which employed Hans Jakob Schmid, patented this process on 4 January 1888 and in 1889 founded the company Photochrom Co. (Photochrom Zurich), which renamed itself Photoglob Zurich (P.Z) in 1895, in order to commercialize Photochromes. These comprised a wide range of formats, from 12x17cm up to 48x91cm, available in travel albums or individually and enjoyed an immediate success, well beyond Switzerland’s borders, with a print-run in excess of ten thousand examples in 1911. Although the pictures’ quality and realism were primarily responsible for this success, the rise in tourism at the end of the 19th century also played a large part. In order to reply to this demand, two subsidiaries were opened: The Photochrom Co Ltd in London in 1896 and the Detroit Photographic Company (DPC) in Detroit in 1898, which became the Detroit Publishing Company in 1905. The First World War and the arrival on the market of the first colour photography processes sounded the knell of the Photochromes.
From February 17th, 2016 the Swiss Camera Museum will exhibit a beautiful display of over five hundred Photochromes from the collections of Gerhard Honegger and Thomas Ganz, acquired respectively in 2006 and 2008, covering mainly Europe, but also North Africa, North America and Asia. An exhibit that comes as a veritable tour of the world and back in time.

A tour of the world in Photochromes
Swiss Camera Museum, Grande Place, 99 - Vevey (Swiss)
17 February – 21 August 2016

opening times: from Tuesdays to Sundays, 11 am - 5,30 pm | closed on Monday | open on bank holidays
admission fee: free
info: +41 (0)21 9253480
cameramuseum@vevey.ch
www.cameramuseum.ch

– – –

[ EXTERNAL RESOURCES ]
Swiss Camera Museum

advertising on FPmag

published on 2016-01-25 in NEWS / EXHIBITIONS







more in EXHIBITIONS



recent news



FPmag

editor in chief Sandro Iovine | sandro.iovine@fpmagazine.eu - senior writer Stefania Biamonti | stefania.biamonti@fpmagazine.eu - web developer Salvatore Picciuto | info@myphotoportal.com - linguistic coordination Nicky Alexander - translations Nicky Alexander, Rachele Frosini - contributor Davide Bologna, Mimmo Cacciuni Angelone, Laura Marcolini, Stefano Panzeri, Pio Tarantini, Salvo Veneziano - local Lazio correspondent Dario Coletti local Sardinian correspondent Salvatore Ligios - local Sicilian correspondent Salvo Veneziano - editorial office via Spartaco, 36 20135 Milano MI | redazione@fpmagazine.eu - phone +39 02 49537170 - copyright © 2015 FPmag - FPmag is a pubblication of Machia Press Publishing srl a socio unico, via Cristoforo Gluck, 3 20135 Milano MI - VAT no. 07535000967 C.F. (TAX code) 07535000967 - Copyright © 2015 FPmag - Registered at Tribunale di Milano No. 281 on the 9th September 2014

about | newsletter | cookies, privacy, copyright